What National Leadership Can Learn

At the end of September we witnessed the second in a series of political cage-matches otherwise known as U.S. presidential primary debates. Afterward an article in the New York Times, Trump Remains Center Stage, wryly summed up the debate with cheerful info-graphics charting each opponent’s attacks and counter attacks. Tellingly the article reveals just how much we’ve come to regard our national politics as a spectator sport.

 

Of course spectator politics is nothing new. We root for our team, we enjoy the give and take, the strategy of outmaneuvering our opponents – it helps us stay involved. And like sports we have generally taken a view that sometimes your side wins and sometimes you lose. But in the last decade or so it seems our better natures have soured, with less give and take, more rancor and an unyielding attachment to entrenched ideologies.

 

Fueled by a cynical media we have devolved to take a more hardened approach. One that stems from a scarcity-driven mentality which assumes anything you gain I must loose. Tolerance and respectful rivalries have ossified into a false dichotomy of conservative vs. liberal, believers vs. nonbelievers, the tolerant vs. the haters. You’re wrong, I’m right. From our national politics to our personal Facebook pages we shout loud and long, vilifying our opponents by proclaiming our own righteousness.

 

What we need to do is to step back and collect ourselves, examine our consciences, and consider our motivations. We need to open ourselves to others; to put ourselves in their shoes, see the world through their eyes and, in the spirit of Jesus, work toward reconciliation rather than perpetuate animosity. All of us.

 

At Leadership Foundations we think of this as the third-way of leadership. We reject the false dichotomy, the either/or scenario, and embrace a leadership inspired more by abundance than scarcity, reconciliation over obstruction — servant leadership that seeks to nurture our common home and sublimate ego to the common good. Our work in cities around the world teaches us that this is the best path to take; to bring together opposing sectors and mobilize them around a common vision or set of values. We achieve lasting progress only when all are considered, all have a say in the outcome.

 

And while we seem mired in the zero-sum game mentality at the national level we are inspired by what is happening locally. We take heart as more and more people discover grace through community. Younger people coming into their own, less bothered by color, gender, sexuality. Who eschew the divisive and embrace that which is larger than themselves – God and our common home.

 

From Pittsburgh to Sioux Falls our cities are undergoing a renaissance. They are becoming centers of innovation, laboratories for democracy and conduits for spiritual growth. Consistently across the US our cities are transforming from places once characterized as battlegrounds into interconnected communities seen more joyfully today as playgrounds.

 

Leadership Foundations knows it is exactly this third-way, this servant style leadership that is enabling transformation to occur, and we are proud of the role we have played cultivating servant leadership in cities across the US and beyond. Our cities are becoming playgrounds not because of ideology or partisan politics, they are becoming playgrounds because local leaders of all walks are putting differences aside, checking their egos and making way for the common good.

 

We think our national leadership could learn a few things from the folks at home.

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