admin, Author at Leadership Foundations

In case you missed this week’s Town Hall

Thanks to all who joined the May 20th Town Hall. Be sure to look out for weekly invitations to upcoming Town Hall meetings. In the meantime, you can register here for the May 27th Town Hall. As always, feel free to share with your network.

We have included the Town Hall recording below as well as each the previous weekly Town Halls.

May 20 Town Hall featuring:

-Jon Eisele from Deloitte LLP on strategic planning

-Chris Martin from Knoxville Leadership Foundation on the incredible work being done in Tennessee.

-Eric Geary with an energizing update on the LF COVID-19 Activation Fund


May 13 Town Hall featuring:

– Dr. William Storrar on leadership during the current normal of the COVID-19 crisis and what he believes is a profound opportunity for leaders to reimagine a post-pandemic future

– Jay Schindler from Miami Valley Leadership Foundation updating us on what is happening in Dayton, OH and how MVLF is responding.

-And an update on the LF COVID-19 Activation Fund and funding opportunity in partnership with Whitworth University

May 6 Town Hall featuring:
– A Funding Opportunity for Local Leadership Foundations in partnership with Whitworth University
– Lisa Lampman and Bianca Singleton updating us on the response from the LF Mentoring network
– Lina Thompson, Senior Pastor at Lake Burien Presbyterian Church

April 29 Town Hall featuring:
– Doug Holladay, Founder & CEO, PathNorth
– Wilna De Beer, Tshwane Leadership Foundation, Pretoria, South Africa
– Leadership Foundations COVID-19 Campaign

April 22 Town Hall featuring:
– Rev. Dr. Terry McGonigal​, Director of the Office of Church Engagement, Whitworth University
– Larry Lloyd, Memphis Leadership Foundation
– Leadership Foundations Impact Analysis Results

April 15 Town Hall featuring:
– Noel Castellanos​, Sr Innovation Fellow​, Colangelo Carpenter Innovation Center
– Rudy Carrasco​, Program Director​, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust
– Sam Skillern, Salem Leadership Foundation, Salem, OR
– Eric Geary, Lexington Leadership Foundation, Lexington, KY

April 8 Town Hall featuring:
– Dale Irvin, Sr Innovation Fellow​, Colangelo Carpenter Innovation Center
– Lisa Slayton, Sr Innovation Fellow, Colangelo Carpenter Innovation Center
– Randy White​, The Center for Community Transformation, Fresno, CA

April 1 Town Hall featuring:
– Dan Cardinali, President & CEO, Independent Sector
– June Carrington, Beacons of Hope, New York City, NY
– Abhishek Gier, Catalyst Leadership Foundation, Delhi, India
– Nathaniel Price, Transform Scott County, Georgetown, KY


COVID-19 Town Hall Meetings

In response to the COVID-19 Pandemic, Leadership Foundations began holding weekly Town Hall Meetings spotlighting relevant experts, theological responses to the crisis, and the real-time responses of the network. In case you have missed them or want to rewatch, you can find the recordings below.

April 1 Town Hall featuring:

  • Dan Cardinali, President & CEO, Independent Sector
  • June Carrington, Beacons of Hope, New York City, NY
  • Abhishek Gier, Catalyst Leadership Foundation, Delhi, India
  • Nathaniel Price, Transform Scott County, Georgetown, KY

April 8 Town Hall featuring:

  • Dale Irvin, Sr Innovation Fellow​, Colangelo Carpenter Innovation Center
  • Lisa Slayton, Sr Innovation Fellow, Colangelo Carpenter Innovation Center
  • Randy White​, The Center for Community Transformation, Fresno, CA

April 15 Town Hall featuring:

  • Noel Castellanos​, Sr Innovation Fellow​, Colangelo Carpenter Innovation Center
  • Rudy Carrasco​, Program Director​, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust ​
  • Sam Skillern, Salem Leadership Foundation, Salem, OR
  • Eric Geary, Lexington Leadership Foundation, Lexington, KY

April 22 Town Hall featuring:

  • Rev. Dr. Terry McGonigal​, Director of the Office of Church Engagement, Whitworth University
  • Larry Lloyd, Memphis Leadership Foundation
  • Leadership Foundations Impact Analysis Results

April 29 Town Hall featuring:

  • Doug Holladay, Founder & CEO, PathNorth
  • Wilna De Beer, Tshwane Leadership Foundation, Pretoria, South Africa
  • Leadership Foundations COVID-19 Campaign

May 6 Town Hall featuring:

  • A Funding Opportunity for Local Leadership Foundations in partnership with Whitworth University
  • Lisa Lampman and Bianca Singleton updating us on the response from the LF Mentoring network
  • Lina Thompson, Senior Pastor at Lake Burien Presbyterian Church
Child from Lexington
27
Apr

Serving Our City in Crisis

Like so many others, we could have never imagined what the beginning of 2020 would hold for our world and nation. We at Lexington Leadership Foundation (LLF) have been challenged with the question,

“How do we serve our city, while still adhering to the guidelines set in place for our community’s safety?”

What does LLF’s role for the city look like during this time? Our team has been collaborating on the best ways to serve our neighbors. We suspended our regular in-person programming and adjusted our work to address the pressing needs of people in our community and shine Christ’s love and light.
Gathering meals for distribution throughout Lexington
We are working with our partners to serve hundreds of meals to children and families- averaging 136 meals distributed per day, along with a smile and a friendly face. We will continue to do this as long as we are able. Our staff is also checking in on our students, their families, volunteers, and partners to identify their needs and connecting them to resources. A few of our students didn’t have a computer at home, so we helped get them one to ensure the kids could do their schoolwork. One of our bi-lingual team members is taking on the role of Resource Coordinator, working by phone to provide emotional support during an overwhelming time and help families access available resources.
We don’t know how long life will operate like this, but we do know that God is good and in control. In the midst of these uncertain times, we continue to lean into our call to serve Lexington and the people who call it home.
dedicated Lexington Volunteers
Dedicated volunteers of Lexington LF distributing supplies and loving neighbors
thank you card
27
Apr

Thank You!

Last month, we asked you to contact your legislator to advocate for support to non-profits during stimulus act negotiations.

Many of you took action by contacting your legislators.  Thank you! As a result of our collective action, Independent Sector recently shared that…
  • Nonprofit needs are included for the first time in all emergency relief packages related to COVID-19
  • All taxpayers can claim the charitable deduction for the first time in 34 years
  • Critical federal programs received additional funds to meet growing needs
  • and Initial federal funding is available to begin establishing systems to help voters safely participate in 2020 elections   
Thank you for helping to make this progress possible and for your support of Local Leadership Foundations and partners work on the ground in communities across the world!
india streets
1
Apr

Leadership Foundations is taking the lead on the COVID-19 crisis

LEADERSHIP IS STEPPING INTO THE GAP

 

The global crisis that we now find ourselves in, with the rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus, is placing unimaginable stress on vulnerable communities and those experiencing poverty. As millions are on lockdown and businesses are closing, unemployment is spiking. Paying rent and utilities, getting food and finding basics like diapers is tougher than ever before.

 

Yet during such a time of uncertainty and crisis, people are together to support one another in new and remarkable ways.

 

Local Leadership Foundations throughout the world are stepping up and taking the lead in helping demonstrate the COVID-19 crisis as a  our collective strength.

 

170,000 volunteers have offered to help UK fight COVID-19 | World ...

 

In Georgetown, Kentucky, the local Leadership Foundation, Transform Scott County is coordinating its volunteer response on behalf of the entire county. In conjunction with local government, Transform Scott County is staffing the local helpline.   

 

In conjunction with church partners, they are managing phone lines every day Monday-Friday. Thanks to their efforts, the elderly and people who are immunocompromised are able to get essential medicine and food, that they’d otherwise have to go without.  We then refer the request to sheriff deputies for delivery or to our local food bank for people who cannot purchase food.

 

Delhi Master Plans fail to crack slum resettlement puzzle - delhi ...

 

RIOTS ON TOP OF THE VIRUS

 

In Delhi, India, the local leadership Foundation, Catalyst, is serving in an extremely tense environment — many have recently lost their homes to riots, migrant farm workers have been pushed out of their humble dwellings, and the city is under a complete lock-down.

 

Catalyst has been given special permission and is one of the only groups in the entire city that can leave their houses to provide services. Every day, their staff work tirelessly to try to meet the emergency needs of the most vulnerable and destitute on the streets of Delhi.

 

Keep Us, our city, our country and the whole world in your prayers.”

says Catalyst president, Abhishek Gier.

 

These are just a few examples of the heroic ways in which Leadership Foundations are stepping up amidst this global crisis on behalf of vulnerable people in cities throughout the world.

 

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

 

Consider making a special gift today to Leadership Foundations to ensure that our network can continue to be as responsive to the growing and long term needs as we seek to not only meet emergency need, but to rebuild and rehabilitate these communities.

 

 

 

26
Mar

Nonreactive Leadership

or, Leadership in a Time of Coronavirus

a reflection by President Dave Hillis

 

It is in times like we find ourselves in today–with the COVID-19 pandemic on everyone’s mind–that many would say to Leadership Foundations,

 

“Cities as playgrounds?

ARE YOU KIDDING ME?

They sure look more like

battlegrounds these days to me.”

 

With social distancing potentially making us see our neighbors as our enemies, and shelter in place orders breeding distrust and fear, it seems like our cities are becoming more like battlegrounds.

 

Counterintuitively, I believe that it is in times like these where this central metaphor of LF, Cities as Playgrounds, holds its greatest promise. In fact, this image of Cities as Playgrounds can remind us all of why going through a trauma like what we’re going through is even worthwhile.

 

So how do we live in a time of crisis like today? How do we lead?

 

I ultimately believe a time like this calls us to live and lead out of a place of freedom. In his second letter to the Corinthians, the apostle Paul simply says, “where the Spirit of God is, there is also freedom.” The movement of God is always drawing us toward a place of freedom- both interior and exterior freedom.

 

And by definition, being free, as a leader, means to engage in the world in a way that is non-reactive.

 

So here are three practical realities in which I believe non-reactive leadership can be lived out in our day-to-day lives:

 

1. Non-reactive Leadership is Characterized by a Non-Anxious Presence

 

You know leaders and you know that place in yourself that is so anxious to please the crowd in front of you, that place so eager for

the approval of others.

 

Leaders who are able to practice “non-anxious presence” recognize that they don’t require the approval of others.

 

They are clearly aware that their ultimate value comes from a source much deeper and unshakable–a source that is much different than the whims of the crowd.

 

 

 

2. Non-reactive Leadership Pivots From the Practice of Being Holy

 

A word that often holds too much religious baggage, the word “Holy” simply points to its relative with a ‘W’, “Whole.

 

When we see things as a whole, we see how they are connected to one another.

 

This then becomes our working assumption in leadership–that ALL things are connected. But the trick is, you can only see this interconnectedness from a nonreactive place.

 

 

 

 

3. Non-reactive Leadership Leads to an Eschatological – not Apocalyptic – Way of Seeing

 

Trappist monk Thomas Merton was known to make this distinction. When we see with Apocalyptic eyes, we are seeing in a way that is in response to what is right in front of us–in other words, reactively, out of fear for what we think the future holds.

 

When we see with Eschatological Eyes, we see with the eyes of hope. This doesn’t paper over the harsh realities we’re experiencing in our day-to-day lives, on our city streets or in our quarantined communities. But nonetheless we can imagine and envision hope in a way that brings our reality into sharper focus–that can envision the fullness of creation being within our reach.

 

 

It is in this place of non-reactivity, of freedom, that all of us can continue to see our communities as places of God’s deep hope and love. Even in times of crisis, God’s promise of our cities as playgrounds is there for us to live into.

25
Mar

LF Theological Roundtable: Jim Wallis on Leadership amidst Crisis

On a quarterly basis, Leadership Foundations holds a quarterly conversation with our network on what it looks like to think theologically as local Leadership Foundations see their cities as playgrounds.

 

We were blessed to host bestselling author and public theologian Jim Wallis, who shared about what it looks like to lead and be a follower of Christ in times of crisis.

 

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE CONVERSATION

25
Mar

Meet Mario Matos

Meet Mario Matos, one of the remarkable leaders in the Leadership Foundations Network. Mario serves as the president of Sinergia, the Leadership Foundation of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

 

In a city that is growing rapidly, with a broadening chasm between the rich and poor, Sinergia is bringing together nonprofits, churches, and businesses to work together for the common good of their city!

 

We had the gift of hearing from Mario recently at a conversation hosted by LF’s Leadership Council, a group LF’s most faithful and dedicated supporters. You can listen to the wonderful conversation by clicking the link below:

 

LISTEN HERE

 

25
Mar

Prayer Amidst the ‘Lockdown’

Amidst pain, fear and uncertainty, we often find those places of hope in the most unexpected places. Irish priest Fr. Richard Hendrick OFM makes this point in his poem below, titled ‘Lockdown.’

Let it be a prayer for all of us in these times of uncertainty:

 

Lockdown

Yes there is fear.

Yes there is isolation.

Yes there is panic buying.

Yes there is sickness.

Yes there is even death.

But,

They say that in Wuhan after so many years of noise

You can hear the birds again.

They say that after just a few weeks of quiet

The sky is no longer thick with fumes

But blue and grey and clear.

They say that in the streets of Assisi

People are singing to each other

across the empty squares,

keeping their windows open

so that those who are alone

may hear the sounds of family around them.

They say that a hotel in the West of Ireland

Is offering free meals and delivery to the housebound.

Today a young woman I know

through the neighbourhood

So that the elders may have someone to call on.

Today Churches, Synagogues, Mosques and Temples

are preparing to welcome

and shelter the homeless, the sick, the weary

All over the world people are slowing down and reflecting

All over the world people are looking at their neighbours in a new way

All over the world people are waking up to a new reality

To how big we really are.

To how little control we really have.

To what really matters.

To Love.

So we pray and we remember that

Yes there is fear.

But there does not have to be hate.

Yes there is isolation.

But there does not have to be loneliness.

Yes there is panic buying.

But there does not have to be meanness.

Yes there is sickness.

But there does not have to be disease of the soul

Yes there is even death.

But there can always be a rebirth of love.

Wake to the choices you make as to how to live now.

Today, breathe.

Listen, behind the factory noises of your panic

The birds are singing again

The sky is clearing,

Spring is coming,

And we are always encompassed by Love.

Open the windows of your soul

And though you may not be able

to touch across the empty square,

Sing

 

The original Facebook post can be found here. Like and share to spread the word.

27
Feb

February 2020 Street Lights Reflection – Dave Hillis

T.S. Eliot, in his poem regarding Ash Wednesday which inaugurates the Lenten Season we are currently walking through as a Church, writes these evocative lines: “Where shall the word be found, where will the word resound? Not here, there is not enough silence.”

 

These words haunt me, and perhaps you. They raise the question not of whether the word is ever present and accessible; we know it is. The very economy of God is described through the parable of the sower as scandalously effulgent. The word is seen falling everywhere on all parts of our life: the holy and the profane. Rather, the question the poem raises is whether you and I are present and accessible. In short, have we nurtured a space where there is “enough silence” so the word can “be found” and, where it will “resound?”

 

One of the great graces of the Lenten Season is that we are given explicit permission to spend time on ourselves in a way that the other four seasons of the church do not allow. We are meant to focus on those places in our life where “there is not enough silence” and make the necessary changes. This is hard work. Work that while needed, can leave us in a state of disequilibrium, despondency and with a feeling of disqualification.

 

And yet, it is in this very season of Lent, and this very place of desperation, that God graciously affords us the time and space to answer Eliot’s question in the positive; that we may collaborate with God’s Spirit to create a “silence” where it is possible that the “word be found” where it will “resound.”

 

Many blessings and may this Lenten Season be a place where you find enough “silence” so the word can be “found” and “resound” in your life, ministry and city.