Creating Change: LF Methodology

Whether it is Jim Collins describing the concept of the flywheel in his book Good to Great, the notion of a theory of change popularized by Carol Weiss in her book New Approaches to Evaluating Comprehensive Community Initiatives, or the scholarly reflections from the Center for Social Innovation at Stanford, all assert the importance of being able to clearly describe how your organization gets something done. Obvious? I think we would all agree. Easy? Maybe less so than we think.

 

For LF, the difficulty arises from the fact that we live in a complex and chaotic world. And of course nowhere is this reality more amply demonstrated than in the very place LF is called to work: cities. Consequently, the idea of discovering, deploying and describing an LF methodology for creating change that takes into account the myriad differences of the cities that we work in while still creating a common model for all is no easy task. Moreover, if the methodology is real it has to meet the following criteria: simple to explain; contextually relevant; repeatable; and if concentrated effort is applied over time, will achieve anticipated outcomes of social impact. And of course, we must describe this all in what is euphemistically called the elevator speech!

 

Through a 6-month and $500,000 investment with one of the leading nonprofit consulting groups in the world, The Bridgespan Group, LF has confirmed and further developed our methodology. It is as simple as it is profound, elegant while also being effective, and transferable while also contextual.

 

LF understands that our methodology—that which we believe holds the key to making cities into playgrounds rather than battlegrounds—is developing leaders who connect and drive the wheel of permanent change in their cities by increasing mastery of the three functions: engaging leaders of good faith and good will, building the capacity of other faith and community based groups, and developing joint programming initiatives. This is LF’s flywheel and theory of change. Over 70 members around the world are using this method to drive change and create healthier, more vibrant cities which gives us pause for great hope.

 

Over the next few months we will be using a number of mediums— to include this newsletter, the City As Playground podcast and LF blog—to further explore LF’s methodology and understanding of how leaders committed to the three functions make cities better.

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